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Training room layouts – what works best?


02/03/2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Trainers,Training Venues,Uncategorized


Training room layouts

Today we are talking about Training room layouts – and what works best, I hope this will encourage you to think about your training space and make the most of it.

The best way to set up your training or classroom room is dependent on the following:

  • Space available to you
  • Furniture available
  • Number of learners in your group or class
  • Type of course you are delivering and the level of activity and interaction required from the learners

6 most common training room layout styles are:

  1. Boardroom Style
  2. Cabaret / Conference Style
  3. Classroom Style
  4. Coaching Style
  5. Horseshoe or U-shape Style
  6. Open Space Style
  7. Square Style
  8. Theatre Style

Training Room Configurations

Boardroom

  • Trainer, Facilitator can stand at the top of the table and can easily move round the group
  • One large table with chairs all the way around
  • Learners have the facilities to make notes and use any equipment needed
  • Great for smaller group discussions

Cabaret or Conference

  • Trainer, Facilitator or Presenter stands at the front predominantly
  • Circular tables with seats on one half, facing forward (sometimes seats completely round the table)
  • Learners have the facilities to make notes and use any equipment needed but some may not be able to have a good view
  • Good for larger groups and Networking events
  • Good for group discussions

Classroom

  • Trainer stands at the front of the room but is able to move around easily
  • Rows of tables with chairs on one side looking forward either 1 or 2 learners per table all facing the front of the room
  • Learners have the facilities to make notes and use any equipment needed
  • This configuration takes up a lot of space
  • Good if you need your learners to be separated for concentration

Coaching

  • Coach sits at the front with a small number of seats set up in a circle
  • Coaching can be setup with or without tables encourages a sense of group and bonding

U-shape  

  • Trainer stands at the front of the room but is able to move in between the centre of the desks to draw learners attention or around behind the learners and around the room
  • Tables in a u-shape with chairs around the outside circumference
  • Learners have the facilities to make notes and use any equipment needed
  • Good for the small to medium groups dependant on room size and furniture available
  • Learners can also see and interact with each other
  • One of the most popular configurations

Open Space Style

  • Trainer can move freely, demonstrate first aid for example
  • No tables just a carpeted room ideal for interactive sessions
  • Sometimes chairs can be pushed back to the side of the room and brought back out if required
  • The Trainer or facilitator needs to be in command of the session otherwise it is common for control to be lost
  • Great for physical activities, team building events, activity based learning

Square Style

  • A group of rectangle tables set up as a square with a hollow middle
  • Good vision of all delegates
  • Learners have the facilities to make notes and use any equipment needed
  • Great for smaller groups

Theatre Style

  • Trainer, Lecturer or Presenter stands centralised at the front
  • Empty centre Isle and chairs in rows facing a white board or projection
  • Presentation or Lecture based Training
  • Learners do not need to interact or make too many notes

Breakout Rooms

Break out rooms can be of any size you can split your group into smaller groups so they can work together autonomously remember each team will need equipment (flip chart, pens paper, games etc.) dependant on the activity you set.

Try and plan the location of the break out rooms in relation to your main training room otherwise you may spend a lot of time running around.

Training Room Tips

  1. Know your venue prior to you getting there were ever possible, have the contact details to hand, know who to go to if you have a problem.
  1. Know how the equipment works and what to do if you have a technical issue during the course
  1. Arrive early be at one with your environment and sort out any problems prior to your Learners arrival
  1. Take pride keep your training room tidy for Health and Safety reasons but also to stop Learner distraction
  1. Check to see what equipment and training resources will be supplied and what you need to take with you.

Most of all – be prepared as anything could happen!

 

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